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Skin Cancer

Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Your Blood Stream

Sunscreen has always been hailed a medical and cosmetic necessity for healthy skin.

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Sunscreen has always been hailed a medical and cosmetic necessity for healthy skin.

However, the UV-filtering product has come under scrutiny lately, and some are questioning if sunscreen could pose a threat to reproductive and developmental health. 

So, is sunscreen dangerous?

Continue reading for the answer to this question and to learn what can happen when sunscreen chemicals enter your blood stream.

According to a New Report: Sunscreen Chemicals Enter Your Blood Stream

A recent report published by the Journal of the American Medical Association is raising some questions about the safety of sunscreen.

More specifically, researchers are trying to determine the extent to which sunscreen chemicals enter the blood stream and potential health implications. 

U.S. Food and Drug Administration Sunscreen Study

Researchers at the U.S. FDA conducted a study on the effects of sunscreen with 24 healthy men and women.

Over the course of four days, participants applied two spray sunscreens, one lotion sunscreen, and one cream sunscreen. Each of the four sunscreens was applied to 75 percent of the body four times a day. 

At the end of the trial, participants’ blood was drawn and evaluated for four key UV-filtering ingredients – avobenzone, oxybenzone, ecamsule, and octocrylene. Findings demonstrated significant levels of the four ingredients in the participants’ blood. 

Is Sunscreen Dangerous? Should I Stop Using It?

In order to accurately assess these findings, it’s important to acknowledge the study’s limitations. To start, the sample size was extremely small, with just 24 participants. The duration, four days, was also very brief.

Additionally, while the results showed a systemic absorption of sunscreen chemicals, it did not provide evidence of subsequent or potential harm.

With that being said, further research is needed to improve understanding of the effects of sunscreen chemicals in the blood.

In the meantime, sunscreen remains an FDA-approved medical product that’s effective in protecting the skin from UV damage, reducing skin cancer risk, and preventing premature signs of aging.

Learn More About Sunscreen and Sun Protection

For additional information about sunscreen and sun protection, visit a skilled and experienced provider in your area.

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Dermatology

Melanie Griffith Opens Up About Procedure on Face

As an actress and a public figure, Melanie Griffith is acutely aware that appearance plays a critical role in her profession.

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As an actress and a public figure, Melanie Griffith is acutely aware that appearance plays a critical role in her profession.

In fact, she admits that securing work as she gets older is a challenge and has undergone cosmetic treatments to help turn back the hands of time.

However, Melanie recently had a different type of surgery to treat skin cancer on her nose.

While she was worried about the impact that this procedure may have on her face, she was relieved that the only side effect she endured was wearing a Band-Aid post-operatively.

Keep reading to learn why many dermatologists and patients prefer Mohs micrographic surgery as a safe and effective treatment for skin cancer.

What Is Mohs Micrographic Surgery?

When patients are diagnosed with skin cancer, especially on their face, they are concerned about their health as well as the permanent mark it may leave on their skin. 

Fortunately, Mohs micrographic surgery allows dermatologists to evaluate and treat skin cancer, while repairing any aesthetic damage to the face. It’s especially useful in cases of basil cell carcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma.

What to Expect From a Mohs Surgery?

Patients with skin cancer or suspicious lesions can undergo Mohs surgery for faster and more physically attractive outcomes. 

Prior to the procedure, the treatment area in numbed with a local anesthetic. The dermatologist then scrapes a very thin layer of cells from the growth and the surrounding skin (margins).

He or she will view this specimen underneath a microscope and look for the presence of malignant cells.

This process is repeated over and over until the margins are determined to be free of cancer. As a result, patients leave the procedure knowing that all skin cancer has been successfully eliminated, rather than waiting for the pathology lab to return biopsy results.

What Is Recovery Like After Mohs Surgery?

As Melanie reported, Mohs surgery requires minimal recovery. The treatment area is often covered with a gauze dressing, and any discomfort can be managed with OTC pain medication.

Additionally, patients may experience redness, itchiness, numbness, bruising, and swelling for approximately five days. The use of ice is recommended for two days after surgery to help minimize inflammation.

To learn more about Mohs surgery, contact a trusted physician in your area.

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Cosmetic Dermatology

Visia Skin Analysis [Video]

The all new 7th Generation VISIA Complexion Analysis System delivers a significantly improved experience for aesthetic and skin care consultations. 

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VISIA Complexion Analysis Is Redefining the Vision of Skin Care

The all new 7th Generation VISIA Complexion Analysis System delivers a significantly improved experience for aesthetic and skin care consultations.

A newly designed capture module rotates smoothly around the subject, greatly simplifying the imaging process while providing greater comfort for the client.

Updated software allows faster image capture with automatic skin type classification, refined facial feature detection and more.

About Cultura:

At Cultura MedSpa, we are honored that our 12-year reputation has consistently placed us to be respected as one of the top cosmetic dermatology centers and leading laser practices in the nation.

Cultura Dermatology & Laser Center
5301 Wisconsin Ave NW
Washington, DC 20015
culturamed.com
(240) 753-6598
http://www.culturamed.com

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Cancer

This Drink Increases Your Risk of Skin Cancer

There’s a certain type of drink that some studies suggest might cause skin cancer.

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There’s a certain type of drink that some studies suggest might cause skin cancer.

Which seems like a no brainer–avoid the cancer drink, I can give up Capri Sun, right?

Unfortunately, the skin cancer correlated drink is alcohol, which, depending on your vices, may be significantly harder to give up.

Ouch. How Bad Is It?

Up to 11 percent bad, actually. That 11 percent is going to be more relevant for people where skin cancer runs in the family, but it’s a hefty figure nonetheless.

One third of a shot of alcohol consumed per day translated to a seven percent higher chance of basal cell carcinoma, and an 11 percent chance of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma.

The scientific suspicion is that the acetaldehyde metabolized from the alcohol can damage DNA–the precursor to the anomalous growth patterns that cause cancer.

What’s This Mean for Me?

That depends on you. It’s easy to ignore these kinds of articles because it
seems that links between things and cancer are perpetually being found.

But this correlation was formed by looking through 13 different studies that amounted to a whopping 95,000 cases. As far as correlations go, this one’s quite strong.

Still, the barest hint of a silver lining is that the connection between alcohol and the most deadly form of skin cancer, melanoma, remains undetermined. That’s only because the study decided to only review non-melanoa cases however.

Ultimately, individuals have to choose how to live their lives. Alcohol has enough difficulties associated with it. A higher chance of skin cancer might not even be its biggest issue.

But the point is, whatever decision you make, it should be an informed one.

Wondering what lifestyle choices you’re making that are helpful are harmful? Speak with a qualified doctor today.

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